Leveraging the Old to Make Way for the New: The British Journal of Photography embraces the iPhone

December 18 2013

Hold on to your iPhones, photographers! The venerable British Journal of Photography has launched FLTR, a new weekly magazine dedicated to iPhone photography, published ONLY on the iPhone. This is a very progressive and forward-thinking move for a magazine with such strong historical roots, founded in Liverpool in 1854 (one hundred years before the Beatles appeared on the scene), and is typical of the smart leveraging of historical brands taking place these days in the UK.

So, about the magazine. The British Journal of Photography has a kind of fusty name, one that is a bit disconnected from how modern they really are. (That is a different brand topic for another day.) They have carved out an important role in the UK photo community, spanning the realms of commercial, fine art, critical analysis, news, events, job listings, and more. In creating FLTR, they are embracing what is going on NOW and what will be taking place in the future of the photo world, rather than pushing against the tide and ignoring or complaining about how bad things are for professional photographers. There are some compelling articles in the first issue, one by the uber-influential Kathy Ryan, and another about the impact smartphones would have had in recording dramatic events such as the attacks on 9/11.


via

These days, non-professionals fluidly take pictures with their phones all the time, freely documenting what they are eating, doing, where they are going, and who they spend their time with. It is estimated that more than 880 billion images will be taken over the next twelve months, with many of the images shot and shared by phone. That’s a whole lot of photos! Some of my photographer clients shoot campaigns on their iPhones, adding special lenses to bring more flexibility and refinement to the shooting process. Other clients of mine are asked to create the feel of iPhone photos – in other words, the naturalism and real life qualities of phone images, but with more technical backbone. Instagram has changed the way that we all relate to photography, and is used very actively as a major marketing tool for professionals, one where technology provides the bridge for a very personal connection between photographer and client or prospective client.

I would pay attention to this magazine, photo people. It’s another way of putting yourself out there beyond your own social media, and a great way of being part of the important conversation about what is going on in photography today.

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

blog comments powered by Disqus