Upcoming Event | Georgetown University Alumni Webinar

September 19 2014

September 23, 2014. 12:30pm – 1:30pm EST

Join us online this Tuesday, September 23rd for Beth’s webinar on: How does your Business Become a Brand, Learn How to Discover, Define and Implement Your Brand to Gain Market Share. This presentation will be hosted by the Georgetown University Alumni Society.
Click here to register for the event.

In this inspiring and thought-provoking interactive seminar, Beth will provide a primer on brand definition. Whether you're expanding, starting out, or looking to reposition and refine your products, business, or organization, this seminar will...
     - show you how to define your brand
     - provide analysis of how other global brands successfully communicate and manage their brands
     - teach you how to thrive using your brand as the center of all you do and communicate for greater impact, happiness and success.
You will come away thinking like a brand strategist, and with some practical tools to use in looking at your own brand, no matter what business you are in.
Click here to find out more about the event.

Also be sure to check out Beth’s guest blog post on the Georgetown University Alumni Career Services Blog! It's a great intro into the webinar presentation.

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9/11

September 11 2014


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Mercurylab’s studio was on Hudson Street, near 7 World Trade Center. We were there for the tragedy and resurrection of our wonderful neighborhood.

This mural has just been installed by Mr. Brainwash for Century 21, the department store that is located facing the original Word Trade Center. Thank you! xo

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Go Forth! Mercurylab in London (Part Five) | Fruit & Veg at the Borough Market

September 10 2014

On a recent visit to the Borough Market, the food market for the ultimate foodies in London, I happened to notice this cute truck attached to a bicycle for wholesale and retailer Turnips. They have one of the first and most beautifully merchandised stalls you see when entering the market, and I’ve been admiring their offerings over the past few years. I was struck by the historic, almost Elizabethan quality of the type and the logo on their truck, and of course by the low-fi delivery aspect of things.


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It turns out that Turnips is not named for a veg, rather for a football (soccer) team, and it neatly cleaved with the owner’s business interests. Turnips began as high-end wholesalers to the top-end chefs in London at a moment when food quality and interest in special ingredients and sourcing was on the rise. They write a great deal about the advent of supermarkets and their impact on the demise of the market stallholders before the resurrection of the Borough Market, and how it coincided with the high quality and standards of their wholesale business. The also had the great good luck to affiliate with Jamie Oliver, and you all know a bit about him and how ubiquitous (and important) he is these days.

The tone and look of their site also has the quality of a well-told yarn, one that is unfurled by the fire on a cold night. These days. they are focused on provenance and quality for both wholesale and retail, sourcing from British farmers, with forays into Europe to find the best of the best. This cute truck is used for deliveries, likely in the East End where people are obsessed with food, as they seem to be throughout London. Anyway, they deliver throughout London, so all I need to do now is make the time to have a dinner party before I head back to Brooklyn!

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Mercurylab/Go Forth! | Mercurylab in the Veneto, Italy (Part Four): The Allure of Presentation

September 05 2014

We all know know that there is an art and craft to effective merchandising display. I was really struck by the divergent displays I found on a quick hit and run trip to Italy. The Veneto is a hotbed of medieval towns and cities, Palladian architecture, and extraordinary masterpieces by Giotto and Tintoretto. It’s also an incredible place to experience truly divergent approaches to merchandising presentation, ranging from controlled vintage to sleek contemporary Italian design.

Cases in point:


An up-to-the-minute gourmet shop built on top of a wine cave built on top of exposed medieval and Roman streets in Vincenza. The prepared food was incredibly light and offered an alternative to a conventional pasta lunch, the product selection a sophisticated mix of carefully chosen artisan made foods, and the display a contemporary approach in its repetition, form and colors.


An osteria in Verona. Osterias serve simple, well-prepared food, and can be known for their wine list. This particular osteria utilizes the complete vocabulary of what was considered by Americans in the 1950s to be the ultimate in traditional italian restaurant design, including checked tablecloths and wine bottles covered with candle wax. The atmosphere is personal and welcoming, reflecting the sense of being invited into the owner’s home. And you could easily buy a bottle of wine to take with you, reinforcing the idea of taking Italy home with you, no matter where you live.


A historic candy shop in Verona, displaying traditional glass jars and product design associated with the past.


A local fashion designer in Verona, one with a quirky Italian aesthetic perfect for a girl from Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Her collection encompasses natural fibers and simple shapes for the bookish girl — slightly boyish, referencing school uniforms, but with sleek and natural details.

All are strong local brands with clear and successful brand messages.